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Workshop, Special Session, and Webinar of Interest

The following webinar, workshop, and special session may be of interest:
 
(1) The Source Complexities of Recent Megathrust Earthquakes as Imaged by the Back-Projection Method Webinar (April 4, 2012)
(2) Mass-transport deposits, olistostromes and mélange formation in modern and ancient continental margins, and associated natural hazards, 29th IAS meeting of Sedimentology (September 10-13, 2012)
(3) Observatories in Scientific Ocean Drilling Workshop (September 10-11, 2012)

(1) The Source Complexities of Recent Megathrust Earthquakes as Imaged by the Back-Projection Method Webinar (April 4, 2012)
 
The USArray Transportable Array Working Group invites you to attend a webinar on "The Source Complexities of Recent Megathrust Earthquakes as Imaged by the Back-Projection Method" on April 4, 2012 from 1-2 pm EST.

Space is limited so please reserve a spot now: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/454159730
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
Following the presentation there will be the opportunity for questions. Contact Andy Frassetto ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) with any inquiries.

Eric Kiser and Miaki Ishii, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University

The back-projection method uses array processing techniques to image the location and timing of energy release of earthquake sources. Though the basic idea of the method is simple, the necessary data coverage for obtaining useful results only recently became available through the development of large aperture, dense seismic arrays such as the High Sensitivity Seismograph Network in Japan and the Transportable Array in the United States. Since the pioneering work that used the method to investigate the rupture properties of the December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust event, back-projection has been used in a number of studies, with significant results ranging from the imaging of supershear rupture to dynamic triggering during deep earthquakes.

For this presentation, we focus on the source properties of the recent 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. Back-projection results show that these ruptures are extremely complex, with multiple propagation directions and rupture speeds composing each source. In addition, it is shown that the rupture properties of these events can vary considerably when data filtered to different frequency ranges are used in the back-projection analysis. These frequency-dependent changes in rupture behavior are interpreted in terms of the tectonic setting and the source processes that may be acting during the rupture.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer
 
 
(2) Mass-transport deposits, olistostromes and mélange formation in modern and ancient continental margins, and associated natural hazards, 29th IAS meeting of Sedimentology (September 10-13, 2012)
 
Dear Colleagues,
We invite you to submit an abstract to the following Session of the 29th IAS meeting of Sedimentology,
10-13th September 2012 Schladming (Austria).
Session T8 S1 - Mass-transport deposits, olistostromes and mélange formation in modern and ancient continental margins, and associated natural hazards
Conveners: Andrea Festa, Yildirim Dilek and Sigrid Missoni
http://www.sedimentologists.org/docs/pages/meetings/ims-scientific-programme/scientific_programme.pdf
Deadline for abstract submissions is 30th April 2012
http://www.sedimentologists.org/meetings/ims-abstract
Mass-transport deposits, olistostromes and mélanges represent significant components of both modern and ancient continental margins, including active, passive and hybrid margin types. Tectonic forces and processes constitute the most common triggering mechanisms to induce both directly (e.g., faulting, thrusting and related seismicity) and indirectly downslope movement and formation of mass-transport deposits, olistostromes and mélanges. The aim of this session is to bring together geoscientists with different backgrounds (e.g., sedimentologists, structural geologists, geophysicists, hydrologists) to examine recent case studies from modern and ancient continental margins in order to better document: (i) the relations between triggering mechanisms, processes and chaotic products; (ii) the dynamics, mechanical stability and morphology of active and passive margins, and (iii) the formation and artifacts of submarine landslides and the con-sequences and mitigation of related hazards (e.g., tsunamis). Comparative analyses of modern and ancient examples are particularly important to help us recognize various chaotic deposits in the rock record and the processes of their formation. Field-based sedimentological, stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, deep-ocean drilling, and submersible studies of different active and passive continental margins are welcome contributions.
 
Kind Regards,
The Session Conveners
Andrea Festa (University of Torino, Italy) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Yildirim Dilek (Miami University, USA) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Sigrid Missoni (Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Austria) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
(3) Observatories in Scientific Ocean Drilling Workshop (September 10-11, 2012)
 
Observatories in Scientific Ocean Drilling
http://iodp-usssp.org/workshop/observatories/
September 10-11, 2012 - Houston, Texas, USA

The International Ocean Discovery Program's science plan identifies observatories as an important platform to push forward scientific boundaries in Earth science. Time-series data from observatories help us address dynamics of physical, chemical, geophysical, and biological systems and foster cross-disciplinary science. We are convening a workshop to educate scientists on the state of the art in observatory science, to explore possible applications of new technologies, to discuss sensor and data needs for addressing fundamental problems, and to discuss strategies for proposing and maintaining long-term observatory experiments.

Full and partial travel support is available for a limited number of scientists. Early career researchers and graduate students are encouraged to apply. To apply, please send a short statement of interest and CV by May 15, 2012. US applicants should contact Brandon Dugan ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ). International applicants from IODP member countries should contact Heinrich Villinger ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ).