Upcoming Distinguished Lectures
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DLP 2014

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Heather Deshon
Heather Deshon smallDr. Heather DeShon is a Seismologist at Southern Methodist University whose research focuses on understanding earthquake initiation and rupture complexity within subduction systems. She uses high-resolution earthquake relocation and tomography to explore the spatial and temporal relationships between seismic source characteristics and structural variability along subduction megathrust faults. More broadly, her research is aimed at improving the characterization of subduction zone seismic and tsunami hazard. Her current work focuses on the Costa Rica-Nicaragua and Sumatra subduction margins.

2013-2014 Host Institutions: 

  • New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology - 9/19/13
  • Trinity University - 10/11/13
  • Midwestern State University - 11/7/13
  • Humboldt State University - 04/14/14

2012-2013 Host Institutions: 

Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Great earthquakes and new insights into subduction seismogenesis(PDF, 6.9 MB)
Technical Lecture: Using seismic tomography to image subduction systems: Applications to Costa Rica-Nicaragua and Sumatra - (PDF, 14.2 MB)
 
 
Rebecca Bendick
Rebecca

Dr. Rebecca Bendick is an Associate Professor at the University of Montana. She studies the deformation of the Earth's lithosphere over a range of length scales from tens to thousands of kilometers. She is especially interested in understanding the mechanisms that produce the continental landscape, including how that landscape is related to the simple forces associated with tectonics and topography.
This research uses many different tools, including numerical simulation, GPS geodesy, seismology and tectonic geomorphology. Working worldwide, she currently has active research projects in the western U.S., Central Asia, Ethiopia and subduction syntaxes globally. She is also interested in the relationship between scientific research and human societies, especially in the context of geologic hazards.

2013-2014 Host Institutions:

  • Saint Louis University - 9/20/13
  • Austin Peay State University - 10/1/13
  • Colorado School of Mines - 10/24/13
  • University of Arkansas - 11/7/13 
Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture:

 How continents challenge the theory of plate tectonics - (PDF, 10.5 MB)

Technical Lecture: Tectonic deformation in continents: combining geophysical data and numerical simulations for constraints, bounds, and (limited) insights - (PDF, 6.3, MB)
 
 
Jeff McGuire 
McGuire GP photo

Dr. Jeff McGuire is an Associate Scientist in the department of Geology and Geophysics at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole MA. He studies faulting and earthquake processes at oceanic transform faults and subduction zones with the goal of better understanding fault-zone structure, the processes that occur during rupture, and the interactions between seismic and aseismic fault slip. He utilizes a combination of geodetic and seismic data from both onshore networks and seafloor instruments. His recent work has focused on East Pacific Rise transform faults and the Cascadia subduction zone.

2013-2014 Host Institutions: 

  • University of Wisconsin, Madison - 11/13/13
  • Carleton College - 11/15/13
  • McGill University - 2/7/14
  • Appalachian State University - 3/21/14
Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture:

Earthquakes and strain release in the Cascadia subduction zone: What have we learned?

Technical Lecture: 20,000 foreshocks under the sea: Studying complete seismic cycles on East Pacific Rise transform faults
 
 
Craig Manning
manning

Dr. Craig Manning is Professor of Geology and Geochemistry in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research focuses on experimental and theoretical study of geofluids at high pressure and temperature, with emphasis on subduction zones, mantle metasomatism, and metamorphic systems. Planetary applications include the high-pressure oceans of our solar system and extrasolar planets. Manning also studies Hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals, Hadean and Archean geology, and the geology and tectonics of central Asia.

2013-2014 Host Institutions: 

  • Colorado College - 10/11/13
  • Case Western Reserve University - 4/15/14
  • Ohio State University - 4/17/14
  • Miami University of Ohio - 4/18/14

2012-2013 Host Institutions: 

  • Lafayette College - 3/1/13
  • Indiana University - 4/15/13
  • SUNY Oswego - 4/19/13
  • Pennsylvania State University - 10/22/13

 

Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Deep Carbon Cycle Accounting: Can the budget be balanced?
Technical Lecture: Going Deep: New Insights into Subduction Zone Fluids
 
 
Kyle Straub
Kyle 4 copyDr. Kyle Straub is an Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Tulane University. He studies Earth surface dynamics and how these dynamics influence the stratigraphic architecture of continental margin deposits. Kyle earned his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007 and was a post-doctoral fellow at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota with the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics. Kyle and his students use a combination of remote sensing of subsurface sedimentary deposits (visualization and interpretation of seismic data), carefully designed laboratory experiments, field studies of modern and ancient transport systems, and targeted numerical analysis and modeling. Kyle’s current work centers on the storage of time in stratigraphy and the generation of non-random patterns in stratigraphy resulting from internal processes of sediment routing systems.

 

2013-2014 Host Institutions: 

  • University of St. Thomas - 11/6/13
  • University of Delaware - 11/8/13
  • Cincinnati Museum Center - 1/23/14
  • University of Cincinnati - 1/24/14
  • University of Texas Pan American - 1/27/14
Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Stratigraphy: A flawed record of Earth’s history, but the best one we have
Technical Lecture: Process controls on stratigraphic completeness and basin filling sedimentation patterns along passive margins
 
 
Josh Roering
Josh mug shot 2010Dr. Josh Roering is a Professor of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon focusing on landscape evolution and mountain-scale erosion and sedimentation.  His research group uses airborne lidar data, geochemical tracers, and remote sensing imagery to study the physical, chemical, and biological processes by which bedrock is eroded, transported, and deposited along continental margins.  Working in Oregon and South Africa, his research tackles how biota and climate contribute to hillslope evolution and erosion.  Projects in New Zealand and Northern California focus on the role of landslides in regulating the height of mountain ranges as well as the timing and pattern of sediment delivered to marine settings.  Josh received his B.S. and M.S. in Geology at Stanford University and his Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley.  He joined the faculty at the University of Oregon in 2001 after a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.


2013-2014 Host Institutions: 

  • Wesleyan University - 11/7/13
  • Kent State University - 11/8/13
  • Queens College - 2/13/14
  • LDEO, Columbia University - 2/14/14
  • Lawrence University - 5/1/14
Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Are mountains like giant sandpiles?: How landslides, earthquakes, and big floods shape steep terrain and control sediment dispersal
Technical Lecture: Limits to life’s role in landscape evolution: Physical, chemical, and biological drivers of erosion along continental margins
 
 
Tyrone Rooney
RooneyDr. Tyrone Rooney is an Associate Professor at Michigan State University focusing on geochemistry. He studies magmatic processes active in continental rift and subduction environments. Tyrone earned his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in 2006 and undertook post-doctoral studies at San Diego State University. Tyrone and his students are seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of continental lithosphere evolution through the coupled use of geochemistry, and petrology. In continental rift environments, Tyrone’s research group is focused on examining the composition of the mantle and magmatic plumbing systems during progressive rifting. Tyrone’s current research in extensional settings is focused on the Main Ethiopian Rift. 


2013-2014 Host Institutions:

  • Michigan Technological University - 9/27/13
  • City College of New York - 11/21/13
  • University of Idaho - 2/6/14
  • University of Florida - 4/24/14

2012-2013 Host Institutions: 

  • Syracuse University - 1/31/13
  • New Mexico State University - 2/20/13
  • Oklahoma State University - February 2013
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks - 4/5/13

 

Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Continental rifting and its role in shaping of the world we live in today
Technical Lecture: From initiation to termination - the critical role of magma in rift evolution
 
 
Chris Scholz
Scholz photoDr. Chris Scholz is Professor of Earth Sciences at Syracuse University. He uses marine geological techniques such as reflection seismology and offshore scientific drilling to study the evolution of extensional basins and the sedimentary architecture of rift basin fills.  His current projects are focused on large lakes in the East African Rift Valley, where new sedimentary records document the dynamic interaction of tropical climate variability and active divergent tectonics, and provide the environmental background to human origins. 


2013-2014 Host Institutions:

  • Mercyhurst University - 03/27/14
  • National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution - 01/30/14
  • Ohio University - 03/28/14
  • Rider University - 04/25/14

2012-2013 Host Institutions: 

  • College of Charleston - 2/13/13
  • Emory University - 4/10/13
  • Florida Atlantic University - 4/5/13
  • University of South Carolina - 4/11/13
Lecture Titles:
Public Lecture: Climate Change and Human Origins: New Discoveries through Scientific Drilling in East Africa’s Great Rift Valley 
Technical Lecture: Comparative Sedimentary Architecture of Magmatic versus Amagmatic Continental Rifts: Case Studies from East Africa